Speed dating structure

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How terrific would it be if there existed a type of social gathering with just a bit more structure; something that romantically eligible individuals would want to attend, but that would also permit data collection and experimental control?

About a decade ago, a rabbi in Los Angeles named Yaacov Deyo provided the answer: speed-dating.

Every night, researchers who investigate relationships and person perception miss out on great opportunities.

Millions of parties and social gatherings take place throughout the world, and no one is there to measure the interpersonal dynamics taking place in these real-world environments.

These questionnaires provide an invaluable source of data that go beyond the simple yes/no response and allow for data analysis using Kenny’s (1994; Kenny & La Voie, 1984) Social Relations Model (e.g. If resources are available, researchers might also wish to take photographs of participants or to audio- and video-record the speed-dates themselves.

In short, speed-dating presents an excellent opportunity for researchers to study a variety of topics related to interpersonal relationships. Therefore, we encourage researchers to consider administering one or perhaps several questionnaires in the wake of the speed-dating event. Using a diary-type format (Bolger et al., 2003), researchers can assess information about participants’ lives in general as well as specific details about their relationships with each speed-dating match. In speed-dating, romantically eligible individuals attend an event where they have a chance to meet all the attendees of the sex that they romantically prefer. Speed-dating as an invaluable tool for studying romantic attraction: A methodological primer. Each date lasts just a few minutes, and the attendees use their quickly generated impressions to decide whether or not they would (‘yes’) or would not (‘no’) be interested in seeing each of their speed-dates again.

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